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Archive for ‘Storytelling in Presentations’

5 Techniques for Representing Complex Information on Your Presentation Slides… So Your Audience Can Actually Consume It – Part 3

Don’t say, “I know you can’t read this slide.”  Instead, consider this technique!
Technique #3
We’re at that point where you’ve considered techniques 1 & 2 (see earlier posts) and you just don’t think simplifying will work.

Then we need to transition into how we serve up the information.

If you need to go through multiple pieces of material, then the next thing to ask yourself is can you address each piece of information with a new slide – in other words, one idea per slide.
Tell the Story of the Data.
The slides below are based on slides from one of my clients.  The numbers …

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Four Techniques for Drawing Business Stories Out of Others – Part 5

“You know, I’ve shared that article about stories you sent me with other prosecutors in my office.”

It was an attorney friend of mine telling me this.  He’s a deputy chief assistant district attorney here in Georgia.  Here is the article he was referring to this article I found on the power of storytelling.

“I don’t understand why people can’t see the stories.  They’re right there in the reports!”

Regardless of the type of organization, most companies have some sort of reports …

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Four Techniques for Drawing Business Stories Out of Others – Part 4

I spent six years in the world of recruiting and learned behavioral interviewing questions back then.  The idea behind behavioral interviewing is that the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior, so ask the interviewee to tell you about their past experience related to important aspects of the job you’re interviewing them for.

Behavior based interview questions start with phrases like…

Tell me about a time when…

Can you give me a specific example of how you…

Describe a problem you’ve encountered with…

I know …

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Four Techniques for Drawing Business Stories Out of Others – Part 3

When I first entered the world of professional speaking, I was taught by some wise mentors to interview a sample of future audience members.  Later I learned of other professional speakers who send out surveys to collect information about their audiences rather than conduct interviews.

I stuck with what I learned first, the person-to-person interviews, probably because I learned it first.

Then, I was doing interviews – for a magazine article not a speech – and wanted to interviewed two subject matter experts (SMEs).  I …

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Four Techniques for Drawing Business Stories Out of Others – Part 2


The Catalyst Story
 

In the last post, we talked about the Business Story Producer which is a method to get people to start sharing business stories.  As part of the steps, you, as the person facilitating the group, should tell a Catalyst Story to activate the business story sharing.

 

Rather than mechanically running through the steps, let’s start with a Catalyst Story, then break down what makes for a good Catalyst Story.

 

My first professional experience was as an ensign in the Navy.  For those …

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Four Techniques for Drawing Business Stories Out of Others – Part 1

Lately I’ve become obsessed with drawing stories out of other people’s lives.  Specifically, I want to help draw business stories out of organizational leaders and subject matter experts so they can use them in presentations and for training others.

I haven’t really found much written on the topic of pulling business stories out of other people – if you know of some good resources, please add descriptions or links to them in the comments below.

In an effort to see what people were doing, I approached a few colleagues I …

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Is It Ever OK to Cry When You’re Presenting? It Depends.

I watched a TED Talk recently in which the speaker, Dr. Peter Attia, choked up.  His throat caught as he appeared to be fighting back tears.  The emotions which surfaced were a mixture of regret, remorse and shame.  He came across as sincere and committed to the topic of this talk – challenging the way we think about diabetes and obesity.

Here’s his TED Talk.

 Is It Ever OK to Cry When You’re Presenting?  It Depends
While this ultimately has to be a question that each presenter must answer for his or herself, here are some rules …

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Help Your Sale Prospects Change Their Own Minds

Mr. Camito was my 4th grade teacher.

I remember him especially well for two reasons.

One – I didn’t have many men teachers growing up.

Two – He and my mother had a lengthy exchange based on a comment on my after my report card about me talking too much in class.   The exchange ended with the suggestion of duct tape for my mouth.  While it was a little funny, I felt badly for not being the perfect little student.

 

Six years ago, I heard World …

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The Top 3 Ways Speakers Confuse Their Audiences

If you’ve ever been on a webinar you know that most webinar tools have a “chat” feature.  It’s a place where participants can go to ask questions of the presenter.

Earlier today I was on a webinar hosted by the Greater Atlanta Chapter of the American Society of Training and Development (ASTD).  As you can see from the picture in this post, I asked of the presenter “can you give examples to help us understand.”  As I continued to listen, I saw Sarah Gilbert type in …

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Most Popular Blog Posts of 2012

With just a few days left in 2012, let’s take a look back and the most popular blogs of 2012! Did your favorite make the list?


#1 – Thank You to Big Fish Games
May 12th, 2012
Life does keep us humble sometimes, yes??

My number one post for the Speaking Practically blog… had nothing at all to do with presentations!

I got …

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