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Archive for ‘Presentation Tools’

5 Tip Top Ways to Regain Your Lost Audience Members

by Claudia Brogan

Each of us knows the feeling: you have carefully prepared your presentation, have dutifully followed Tom Nixon’s tips on designing a pithy, useful set of slides. You have practiced faithfully, researched your audience and your topic. And there you stand, right up at the front of the room, smoothly heading through your remarks and key points. And there, to your observant eye, appears the sight of a distracted or confused audience member. Perhaps this person checked out for a brief minute to check their …

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The 10 Most Popular Speaking Practically Blog Posts of 2015

by Kelly Vandever

As the year draws to a close, it’s time once again to recap the top 10 most visited blog posts of the year.

As you reflect over the last year and begin planning for 2016, we hope you’ll find these topics and thoughts helpful.

Thanks for a great 2015!

Kelly

 
 #1 – What If I Don’t Like the Default Size 16:9 in PowerPoint 2013?

Currently, when opening a new slide …

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Anchor Your Presentation

by Bob Goodyear

Have you ever sat in on a presentation or speech and couldn’t remember the points the speaker was making just 10 minutes after it was done? Maybe you remember that you felt good about what was being said but you just couldn’t talk about specifics to anyone afterwards. That is incredibly frustrating to me as an audience member. It’s even MORE frustrating, however, to me as the speaker because that tells me that I didn’t do a good job making my points memorable.

How can we …

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Making Data Meaningful

by Tom Nixon

An ongoing challenge that technical presenters have is how can large data sets in charts and graphs be presented without overwhelming the audience. Showing the full set of raw data is often necessary to establish a starting point or source. It may also be important to not appear to be “dumbing-down” the information. But a slide with dozens or even hundreds of data points simply cannot be assimilated from the screen.

The solution is to make the data meaningful by distilling down your numbers to just …

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“Word-A-Pa-Looza”

by Claudia Brogan

Making the effort to continually improve and stretch your vocabulary is likely to pay off in spades.

When a speaker uses strong, descriptive words — and uses them correctly! — credibility is strengthened and audience members sit up and take notice.

 

Here are two specific reasons for using strong, descriptive words:

First, studies show that it is good for our own brains to increase brain capacity by stretching to learn new things. No need to do rote memorization of 20 random words, over and over. But more realistically and effectively, it works …

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Microsoft Sway – Putting Content & Presentations into Design Templates – Trying Embed Code Feature

by Kelly Vandever

Sway is a new Microsoft produce available for free…  but it’s a little hard to explain.  Wikipedia calls it a “presentation program” and it can be used for presentations, but it’s probably better suited for publishing content.  It’s part of Microsoft Office, but it’s free and not part of the Office 2016 download.  You can access it online at Sway.com or you can download Sway app to your laptop, iOS, Android device or your Windows phone.  You have to have a Microsoft account …

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Q&A – A Different Way

by Bob Goodyear

Recently I spoke at a technical conference where the audience was made up of professional technical sales people. My objective was to explain a new technology to this group and have them understand why their customers were looking at implementing it in their datacenters. The traditional way to do this is to have a presenter (me) stand up and explain it for 45 minutes and then open the session to Q&A. I wanted to make the presentation different so I tried something new.

I never …

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