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Archive for ‘Presentation Tips’

Top 10 Blog Articles of 2016!

As is our tradition, it’s that time of year when we share the most popular blog posts of the year.  As luck – or Google juice – would have it, all but one of the most popular posts were actually posted before 2016.

Review the list and see if there’s any important articles you may have missed!
Enjoy!

#1 – Need to Show a Website While You Present?  Two Quick Tips Using PowerPoint!
By Kelly Vandever

I watched a conference presenter who used Google docs …

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3 Whiteboard Tips

by Bob Goodyear

One of the most effective methods for presenting is using a whiteboard instead of a PowerPoint deck. I really like to use the whiteboard because it allows me to be able to ask questions and reflect the responses from my audience on the whiteboard. While we talk a lot about PowerPoint on this blog with our resident expert, Tom Nixon, I feel like we have short-changed other methods of presenting. Because of that, I want to share 3 whiteboard tips with you to help you have another method of …

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A Few Useful Photography Tips

by Tom Nixon

When creating an effective visual presentation (a.k.a. PowerPoint) it is extremely helpful to have sources of good images to draw from. Access to a good stock image house is more than helpful. So is a good set of photography skills. Being able to take reasonably high-quality photos of coworkers, processes, locations, products and the like is a real ace-in-the-hole when assembling a presentation. And with today’s amazingly advanced cameras, it has never been easier.

A few tips:

Get close. Many part-time photographers can be intimidated by their …

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Un-aligned text can create interest

by Tom Nixon

A few weeks back I discussed the value of using text alignment to build a sense of organization and structure in your slides. But too much organization is repetitious and boring.

The technique I like to use is to build order first using alignment and consistency. Then, I intentionally break the pattern using one element that is obviously not part of the structure of the document or slide. The resulting break-out adds interest and excitement.

Try it. You’ll like it.

Tom Nixon has over 3 decades of experience assisting clients with meaningful …

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Zoom – PowerPoint’s Answer to Prezi? Valuable New Tool? You Make the Call!

By Kelly Vandever

So the last time you were hanging out on the Insert tab of PowerPoint 2016, did you happen to look at the Links group? Have you noticed the new comer? Yes, that’s right, there’s a new link available called Zoom! One of the newest features in PowerPoint!

Not to be confused with Zoom when in presentation mode and you zoom in for a closer look at the slide. Or the Zoom In on bottom right status bar. …

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I Know You Can’t Read This But …

by Tom Nixon

The most profound words crammed into a screen with a few hundred others become lifeless and impotent. They frustrate and annoy our audiences. When read from the screen to our listeners they become the fuel for the universally recited, number one complaint: “I hate it when they turn and read the slides to us!”

No wonder PowerPoint is so reviled.

If you ever find yourself saying, “I know you can’t read this but…” that is an indication that you are committing the most grievous of errors: too …

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Stories Connect. Big Time.

By Tom Nixon

Melissa was running through her upcoming slide presentation with me. She loaded up her PowerPoint deck with all the facts and figures she could find that would make her pitch irresistible. There was an almost endless march of slides with numbers, features and benefits.

I had to stop her and ask, “Why not tell your listeners a story? Or use a testimonial or a case-study?”

“Think of a success story that involves you and a client. Maybe you can get a quote from them or, better yet, a quote …

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If You Show It, They Will (Try to) Read It

By Tom Nixon

Watching a presentation lately I was reminded of a principle that is fundamental to how audiences experience a presentation. The presenter projected an image of an historical plaque. The text on the plaque was only slightly relevant to the subject. I, and I assume most members of the audience, read the first line or two and then gave up. It was too much and it really didn’t add to any deeper understanding of the subject matter.

The principle: If you put text on the screen, any text, in …

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Becoming a Great Impromptu Speaker

By Natalie Gallagher

 

The first time I was called on to give an impromptu speech in front of my colleagues, I was so nervous and unprepared that I rambled incoherently for 30 seconds, then spoke as fast as I could through my key points. Later someone told me I should’ve been an auctioneer instead of a professor. Does this sound familiar to you?

 

There’s much we can do to be great at delivering prepared presentations, but more often than not, we will be called on to deliver speeches on the spot. Every …

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Handling Flub-Ups Like a Pro

 
By Claudia Brogan

 
Dropping a microphone, forgetting the next sentence in your speech, noticing mid-delivery that the power point slide has a spelling mistake.

Each of these flubs— and many more—populate the dreams of those who do public speaking.

 
HIGHS AND LOWS
Lately, I have been observing speakers to watch how they handle the unexpected. I have learned a lot from watching pros handle mistakes with grace. In other situations, I have sighed with empathy when other speakers have …

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