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Archive for ‘PowerPoint Slides’

The Presentation Skill No One is Talking About

By Mark Kretschmar

There’s a lot of great content out there on presentation skills. For the most part, it focuses on two things: 1) Slide content and design or 2) Speaking skills like preparation, attitude, what to do with your hands and feet, etc. What I rarely hear talked about is the intersection of slides and speaking – engaging the slides while you present. This matters, and someone needs to talk about it.
What the Presenter Does
The presenter is speaking away and at certain moments they click the remote and the slide changes, …

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Use a quote to extend your brilliance

By Tom Nixon

This is an effective quote slide that speaks to the constant struggle that many feel when challenging their boundaries. The evocative quote is coupled with a subtle image that offers the viewer an opportunity to read their own experiences and thoughts into the scene.

 

Tom Nixon has over 3 decades of experience assisting clients with meaningful business communications. Contact Tom to see how he can work with your business leaders and subject matter experts to create stunning visual presentations (PowerPoint, Keynote, etc.) and enhance their on-stage delivery.

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Before and After: Training Visuals

By Tom Nixon

This original slide was created for a presentation that would suggest ways an insurance sales professional could engage a customer in some friendly small talk. The instructor would simply read the text on the screen to his workshop attendees — a very ineffective way to begin a conversation about the topic.

Let’s see what was done to enhance this slide:

Although the other slide redesigns in the deck are not shown, an overall background and style had been established. The headline typeface and style were chosen to suggest a friendly, casual but …

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Question Every Slide

By Tom Nixon

As you add, edit or review your slides here are 2 quick questions you can ask about each slide to see if it is just right for your presentation:
1. What is the POINT?
Does this slide have a single, clear, easily communicated message for your audience? Is it congruent with the goals of the presentation? Does it simply make sense for where it is and what it is saying?
2. Where is the POWER?
Does this slide deliver its message powerfully and efficiently? Are the graphics unambiguous and professional? Is the wording …

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The Latest News in Font Compatibility across PC and Mac Versions of PowerPoint!

By Kelly Vandever

 
Good News on the Font Front!
Not many people will appreciate good news about fonts…

But if you have to be flexible enough to present your PowerPoint slides on either a PC version of PowerPoint and a Mac version of PowerPoint, I have good news.

With the latest update to PowerPoint for the Mac, Microsoft made it so that fonts that are saved as embedded fonts* in a Windows version of PPT can now come over and be viewed correctly in Mac version of PowerPoint!  Yeah!  This should help some presenters from …

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Does Presentation Anarchy Rule?

By Mark Kretschmar

As a presenter, you can and should be in complete command of the audience. Using current rules, anarchy reigns, and it’s costly.

Well-intentioned rules are hurting your presentation skills. This problem is compounded when we look at several rules at the same time and see the dysfunctional presentation culture they create.
 A Deadly Affliction
We’ve all been in too many presentations where the presenter advances slide after slide of bullet points and reads them from the screen. We begin to contemplate sticking a pencil in our eye as an excuse to leave …

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Type Size Matters

By Tom Nixon

What is the correct size for type on a slide? How big should a headline be? What is the minimum size you can use for body text?

For those unfamiliar with design basics these are difficult questions. The simple (and flip) answer is “whatever works.” That doesn’t help very much. Here are some of my guidelines:

Legibility is the critical concern. Can your audience clearly see and easily read your slide from the back of the room? How often have I heard a speaker apologize, “I know that …

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If PowerPoint Were a PowerSaw, Most Presenters Would Be Missing Fingers

By Mark Kretschmar

“PowerPoint makes us stupid.” That astute observation is from our current Secretary of Defense, James Mattis. As a result of this view, PowerPoint has been banned from many military conference rooms. Some academic institutions and corporations are following suit (Psychology Today).

They’re right – essentially. But PowerPoint itself is not the problem – exactly. Displays of appropriate visual support are powerful in their ability to drive meaning and retention.
The User, Not The Tool
It’s not PowerPoint; it’s how presenters are using PowerPoint that leads to “stupid-making.” A …

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Inspiration is Everywhere

By Tom Nixon

When you are faced with a project or presentation that seems impenetrable, try looking for creative ideas and solutions outside your particular area of expertise or discipline. Years of having to deal with multiple diverse publishing projects taught me to have a mental list of inspiration locations I could visit to get the creative juices flowing. Some of my favorites: card stores, TV sports graphics (this would give me a great excuse to watch Sunday football), and the local quilting fabric stores — fabric designers …

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To be an Expert or a Master

By Tom Nixon

Any chart or graph can be a dense forest of data unless you deliberately create it with the goal of making the complex understandable. This double axis chart is a build slide with each component revealed as the presenter introduces them so that the audience can understand how the chart works without the initial confusion caused by showing the entire chart at once.

The goal here is to show how presentation technique and the complexity of the content work together to affect how the audience responds to the speaker.

The vertical …

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