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Archive for ‘Leadership in Presentations’

Does Eye Contact Really Work?

 

By Mark Kretschmar

There’s a problem with the way most presenters do eye contact. But first, let’s look at what’s going right.

We’ve all endured enough presentations void of eye contact. (You know you have an engineer’s attention “when they are looking at your shoes instead of at their own.”) Well, I’m glad to say that’s an exaggeration.

Getting speakers to look at the audience members’ faces is a huge step in the right direction. Eye contact is good. Always. But it can be great. A major reason eye contact is emphasized in public …

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How to Plan a Group Presentation that Doesn’t Suck

By Natalie Gallagher

Several years ago I was teaching an art history class that had a group presentation component: each group had to present on a 20th century art movement. Back then I was relatively new to teaching and didn’t realize that group work – and the corresponding presentation – was one of the most dreaded types of assignments a student could encounter. As I described the assignment I could see the look of horror and dread cross even the most optimistic students’ faces. Despite years of indoctrination about how marvelous teamwork …

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The Presentation Skill No One is Talking About

By Mark Kretschmar

There’s a lot of great content out there on presentation skills. For the most part, it focuses on two things: 1) Slide content and design or 2) Speaking skills like preparation, attitude, what to do with your hands and feet, etc. What I rarely hear talked about is the intersection of slides and speaking – engaging the slides while you present. This matters, and someone needs to talk about it.
What the Presenter Does
The presenter is speaking away and at certain moments they click the remote and the slide changes, …

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Have a Planned Question for Your Silent Q&A

By Bob Goodyear

Have you ever asked, “Do you have any questions” during your presentation and received no response from the audience? How did that feel? How long did you wait before moving on?

As a technical presenter, it is expected to have a Q&A period during your presentation. However, having no one raise their hand to ask a question is one of the most uncomfortable feelings I’ve ever experienced in my years of presenting. I tried all kinds of methods to handle this. I would many times laugh it off with a …

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Avoiding the Pitfalls of Group Exercises for Speakers

By Claudia W. Brogan

Recently a budding speaker asked me to attend a speech she was delivering and provide feedback for her, with suggestions for improvement. Maggie opened her speech with an intriguing quotation, captured the attention of the audience and proceeded to deliver three excellent learning tips.

Midway through the presentation, though, I watched as Maggie asked—without much instruction or introduction—that her audience members move into groups of four to complete a worksheet of questions. What I saw happen in the room was a bit of a chill: audience members shifted from …

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The Danger of Too Much Information

By Tom Nixon

Too much information? In general, the reason any of us are standing in front of the room for any kind of presentation is that we know what we are talking about. We are experts. We know the material and we have the ability to go deep into our content. And therein lies a problem — especially when it come to visual presentations — we just have too much information and we feel we must deliver it all to our audience.

“A little bit is good. Maybe a few more slides …

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Finding That Topic in the ‘Sweet Spot’ of Your Venn Diagram

By Claudia Brogan

One of my very favorite bloggers in the arena of communication is Andrew Dlugan (“Six Minutes”). Heaven only knows where he comes up with the excellent topics and resources that he shares for teachers, speakers and trainers. Oh wait…it’s not just Heaven that knows. Actually, Andrew generously divulges a great tool for coming up with good speaking subjects.

He calls this the “Secret of choosing successful speech topics” and I highly recommend to you his thorough, thought-provoking blog piece linked below.

Consider finding that “sweet spot” right in the …

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Give Your Graph A Point of View

by Tom Nixon

Every part of your presentation should move your audience toward the goal that you set for the entire presentation. Simply dumping a data set into a graph in PowerPoint only gives your audience part of the story — just the raw information.

You are the expert. Ideally they want to know what you think, what you have discovered about the subject, and how you see things. Give your charts and graphs a point of view by emphasizing the specific data that is critical to …

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5 Tip Top Ways to Regain Your Lost Audience Members

by Claudia Brogan

Each of us knows the feeling: you have carefully prepared your presentation, have dutifully followed Tom Nixon’s tips on designing a pithy, useful set of slides. You have practiced faithfully, researched your audience and your topic. And there you stand, right up at the front of the room, smoothly heading through your remarks and key points. And there, to your observant eye, appears the sight of a distracted or confused audience member. Perhaps this person checked out for a brief minute to check their …

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The 10 Most Popular Speaking Practically Blog Posts of 2015

by Kelly Vandever

As the year draws to a close, it’s time once again to recap the top 10 most visited blog posts of the year.

As you reflect over the last year and begin planning for 2016, we hope you’ll find these topics and thoughts helpful.

Thanks for a great 2015!

Kelly

 
 #1 – What If I Don’t Like the Default Size 16:9 in PowerPoint 2013?

Currently, when opening a new slide …

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