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Archive for August, 2018

Does Eye Contact Really Work?

 

By Mark Kretschmar

There’s a problem with the way most presenters do eye contact. But first, let’s look at what’s going right.

We’ve all endured enough presentations void of eye contact. (You know you have an engineer’s attention “when they are looking at your shoes instead of at their own.”) Well, I’m glad to say that’s an exaggeration.

Getting speakers to look at the audience members’ faces is a huge step in the right direction. Eye contact is good. Always. But it can be great. A major reason eye contact is emphasized in public …

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Bringing Your “Be Game” as a Speaker

 

 

by Bob Goodyear

As speakers we often hear that we need to bring our “A Game” whenever we speak. This infers that we should always be the best whenever we speak. I want to suggest, however, that perhaps we should concern ourselves more with our “B game” instead, but not in the way you might think. Let’s change the B to “Be”. Let’s talk about some characteristics that we should be in order to be a more successful speaker.
Be Yourself
This is a well-worn cliché but it’s still applicable to us as speakers. I …

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Wanted: A Good Editor

 

By Tom Nixon

A recurring problem I see when coaching professionals of all types is the lack of good editing. Whether writing a speech or creating a visual presentation (PowerPoint, Keynote, etc.), we all put in too much information and then hate to trim it down. It is just human nature.

But the realities of live presentations are that there is only so much the audience can walk away with. The more we try to deliver from the podium the less our listeners will absorb. We must edit.

I believe good editing …

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Old Habits Die Hard

by Claudia W. Brogan

Several years ago, I joined a local Toastmasters club in order to improve and become more practiced in my speaking skills. In the first club that I visited, I noticed an odd method that they used: each time that a speaker would say “um” in a presentation, a member would ring a little silver bell. Apparently, the intention was to quickly get the speaker’s attention so that he or she would notice they said “um” and correct that action. This technique is apparently based on Pavlov’s experiments in classical …

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