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Archive for ‘Speech & Presentation Coaching’

The Most Common Public Speaking Question Is …

by Bob Goodyear

Over the last month I’ve had the chance to speak to several groups on the topic of public speaking. Before two of the sessions, the host asked the attendees to submit questions for me to answer during my time with them. While I received many great questions, the most common one was a variation of, “What can I do about being nervous before and during my speech?”

Let me share with you three of the techniques I suggested.
Nervousness is Natural
First, remember that nervousness is something that naturally happens …

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Just Say No

by Claudia Brogan

Not long ago I served as a speaking-coach for a highly intelligent scientist as he prepared to deliver an upcoming presentation. I can still remember our first meeting as we began the speech preparation process. For a 45-minute presentation timeslot, he brought 10 pages of script, double-spaced, lengthy, and dense. In a sense, he couldn’t resist the temptation to tell the audience everything he knew about his topic. We set those voluminous notes aside and created a brief list of the most crucial and timely ideas that …

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Finding That Topic in the ‘Sweet Spot’ of Your Venn Diagram

By Claudia Brogan

One of my very favorite bloggers in the arena of communication is Andrew Dlugan (“Six Minutes”). Heaven only knows where he comes up with the excellent topics and resources that he shares for teachers, speakers and trainers. Oh wait…it’s not just Heaven that knows. Actually, Andrew generously divulges a great tool for coming up with good speaking subjects.

He calls this the “Secret of choosing successful speech topics” and I highly recommend to you his thorough, thought-provoking blog piece linked below.

Consider finding that “sweet spot” right in the …

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Get Out Of The Rut

By Bob Goodyear

Years ago, I went camping with my Boy Scout troop one spring. Our campsite was guaranteed to be incredibly fun! It was off the beaten path and only accessible by a single dirt road that few people knew about. We reached the dirt road full of the anticipation that only a group of 12-13 year old boys could generate. We piled in the back of our scoutmaster’s truck and headed down the road. It was easy to follow because of the ruts that had …

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3 Reasons to Perfect Your Pause

by Natalie Gallagher

When we are scared, anxious, or excessively nervous, our body kicks into fight-or-flight mode, a natural survival instinct.

Because public speaking can be a terrifying experience for many, the brain can trigger the “flight” response, and cause us to speak as quickly as possible in order to get off the stage as soon as possible. For me, speaking incredibly fast was one of the biggest hurdles I had to overcome to improve my speaking. On stage, my nerves combined with excitement over my topic made it sound like …

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The 10 Most Popular Speaking Practically Blog Posts of 2015

by Kelly Vandever

As the year draws to a close, it’s time once again to recap the top 10 most visited blog posts of the year.

As you reflect over the last year and begin planning for 2016, we hope you’ll find these topics and thoughts helpful.

Thanks for a great 2015!

Kelly

 
 #1 – What If I Don’t Like the Default Size 16:9 in PowerPoint 2013?

Currently, when opening a new slide …

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“Word-A-Pa-Looza”

by Claudia Brogan

Making the effort to continually improve and stretch your vocabulary is likely to pay off in spades.

When a speaker uses strong, descriptive words — and uses them correctly! — credibility is strengthened and audience members sit up and take notice.

 

Here are two specific reasons for using strong, descriptive words:

First, studies show that it is good for our own brains to increase brain capacity by stretching to learn new things. No need to do rote memorization of 20 random words, over and over. But more realistically and effectively, it works …

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An Invasion Heading Toward Us

by Claudia Brogan

Watch out, grab your sturdy helmet, prepare to take action: there is an invasion coming. And it’s affecting public speakers and presenters nearly as frequently as newscasters and pundits.

Yes, that’s right. There is indeed an invasion going on. And I like to call it The Invasion of Over-Used and Unneeded Phrases.

Beware. These phrases and tired words can sometimes sneak into your presentations when you least expect them. Perhaps this might happen to us during our speeches, when we’re trying to sound well-educated and intellectual. Or …

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Einstein forgets his keys

by Tom Nixon

I cannot imagine that Albert never misplaced his keys. Or walked into a room and couldn’t remember why he was there. What hope do the rest of us mortals have?

There are two ideas worth noting in this slide: 1) Using quotes is a great way to make a point while leveraging someone else’s expertise and 2) Images can add a point of humor to your presentation without the need for you to actually tell a joke.

Tom Nixon …

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Finding Your Voice

by Claudia Brogan

Just recently I had the very odd and unsettling experience of literally losing my voice for several days. And by that I mean that I couldn’t make a peep: not a low quiet chuckle, not an encouraging “Uh huh, you bet!” when a friend was telling me a story, not a sweet little “Thank you” when a kind person opened a door for me.

With all the colds and springtime bugs going around, perhaps this malady has happened to you. (Though I wouldn’t wish this on …

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