• open panel
  • Home
  • Archive by category 'Presentation Coaching'
  • Page 2

Archive for ‘Presentation Coaching’

Wise, Witty Ways to Begin Your Presentations Well

By Claudia Brogan

Rather than “limp” in to your next presentation, pay attention to boldly choose a good Attention-Getting introduction. Grab the audience by the lapels so to speak, make them say a quiet thoughtful “ahh,’ or tickle their funny bone. The next time you have the opportunity to deliver a speech, training session or presentation, give special thought to how you can start off vividly.

These specific methods may help you get unstuck, or may spark a new idea for creating your next good speech-beginning.

Deftly use humor or an opening quote.

Read More
 

Don’t Let Your Slides Tie You Down

by Tom Nixon
Long ago I would start my PowerPoint presentations standing next to the screen so that the audience could see both my slides and me.
A trusted coach suggested that was the weakest spot I could stand in – in the shadows, back and to the side, away from my audience. This is where I would begin my presentations! Not good.
Presenters often have great difficulty avoiding the beam of light from their projectors. The projection device is often on a table or hanging from a low ceiling in a conference room or …

Read More
 

Design Principles for your Presentations: both literally and figuratively

By Claudia Brogan

One of my speaking heroes recently recommended to me the fine books by Garr Reynolds, Presentation Zen and Presentation Zen Design. Whether you consider yourself an experienced graphic artist or are early in your development of presentation design, you’ll certainly find unique and borrowable tips that you can relate to and act on. Reynolds has a knack for trimming ideas to their elegant, clarified essence.

I highly recommend that speakers learn Reynolds’ key presentation ideas. One crisp, clear overview with a useful introduction to the principles of Garr Reynolds can …

Read More
 

3 Rehearsal Tips

By Bob Goodyear

Over the last few months, I’ve helped two people prepare for important presentations they were scheduled to give. As they created their content and fine-tuned their PowerPoint decks, they both asked the best way to practice for the actual presentation. Today, I’ll share with you the 3 tips I gave them about rehearsing for a presentation.
Tip #1 – Always rehearse verbally
This simple tip is often ignored by presenters. Early in my presenting career I considered rehearsal to be nothing more than putting my slides in presentation mode and just thinking …

Read More
 

3 Whiteboard Tips

by Bob Goodyear

One of the most effective methods for presenting is using a whiteboard instead of a PowerPoint deck. I really like to use the whiteboard because it allows me to be able to ask questions and reflect the responses from my audience on the whiteboard. While we talk a lot about PowerPoint on this blog with our resident expert, Tom Nixon, I feel like we have short-changed other methods of presenting. Because of that, I want to share 3 whiteboard tips with you to help you have another method of …

Read More
 

Just Say No

by Claudia Brogan

Not long ago I served as a speaking-coach for a highly intelligent scientist as he prepared to deliver an upcoming presentation. I can still remember our first meeting as we began the speech preparation process. For a 45-minute presentation timeslot, he brought 10 pages of script, double-spaced, lengthy, and dense. In a sense, he couldn’t resist the temptation to tell the audience everything he knew about his topic. We set those voluminous notes aside and created a brief list of the most crucial and timely ideas that …

Read More
 

Why Speakers Do Well To Learn About Brain-Post

Image source: FLICKR – JohnDiew0107

By Claudia Brogan

I have always been captivated with the connection between public speaking skills and how the brain works. Learning about brain and cognitive science is quite intriguing, and can provide illuminating topics for public speakers.
Why include visual, auditory, and kinesthetic elements in your speech?
Knowing that audience members use their visual, auditory, and kinesthetic senses throughout the presentation helps the speaker address each of those senses.

Speakers can insert visual illustrations via PowerPoint, objects and props, expressive facial gestures, or hand movements which amplify the speech.

Auditory …

Read More
 

Stories Connect. Big Time.

By Tom Nixon

Melissa was running through her upcoming slide presentation with me. She loaded up her PowerPoint deck with all the facts and figures she could find that would make her pitch irresistible. There was an almost endless march of slides with numbers, features and benefits.

I had to stop her and ask, “Why not tell your listeners a story? Or use a testimonial or a case-study?”

“Think of a success story that involves you and a client. Maybe you can get a quote from them or, better yet, a quote …

Read More
 

Get Out Of The Rut

By Bob Goodyear

Years ago, I went camping with my Boy Scout troop one spring. Our campsite was guaranteed to be incredibly fun! It was off the beaten path and only accessible by a single dirt road that few people knew about. We reached the dirt road full of the anticipation that only a group of 12-13 year old boys could generate. We piled in the back of our scoutmaster’s truck and headed down the road. It was easy to follow because of the ruts that had …

Read More
 

Check, Please

by Bob Goodyear

Imagine that a friend stops by and asks you to come along to help with some kind of an errand.  The first questions you may ask is where are you going and what are you going to be doing.  Wouldn’t you want to know that?

When we present, we need to tell our audience the same things.  We need to tell them where they are going and what they will be doing or hearing.  We need to give them a road map of our presentation up front.

A road map helps …

Read More